Wagstaff & Brunt






 

Location and period of operation:

Wagstaff & Brunt

Longton

1880

1980

 

Earthenware and China manufacturers and then merchants at the Richmond Pottery, Church Street, Longton, Stoke-on-Trent, England.
  • In 1880 Wagstaff & Brunt started business as earthenware and china manufacturers at Edensor Road, Longton. 

  • Around 1887 they moved to King Street Pottery, Longton. 

  • At least by 1899 they were described as 'China and Earthenware Merchants, at Richmond Pottery' The partners were Peter Wagstaff (who died in 1899) and John Brunt the younger. After the death of Peter Wagstaff the business was continued by John Brunt and retained the name 'Wagstaff & Brunt' 

  • Colin Mosley Brunt operated as a hay and straw merchant in Lytton Street, Stoke. Peter Wagstaff and John Brunt had an interest as the '& Co'. 

  • Some reference books give a 1880 to 1927 as a date range when Wagstaff & Brunt were manufacturers. However a 1899 London Gazette entry, a 1907 directory and 1908 advert all describe them as merchants. 

  • Wagstaff & Brunt had ware produced on their behalf with the marking 'Wagstaff & Brunt' 

  • The business continued until 1980 when Wagstaff & Brunt Ltd was wound up.  

 

Wagstaff and Brunt shared the works with pottery manufacturers - the following are known:

  • 1907 -               Radcliffe & Co, earthenware manufacturers 

  • 1922-c.1946 -     Bradleys (Longton) Ltd as china manufacturers at the Crown Clarence Works

  • 1947 - 1971        Co-operative Wholesale Society's Crown Clarence Pottery (earthenware)   

 


The London Gazette
17th October 1899

 
Notice of the dissolution of the partnership between
the late Peter Wagstaff and John Brunt the younger

The business carried on by John Brunt Junr.

 


 


Lytton Street
Brunt, C.M and Co., 
hay and straw merchants 

from..... 1907 Staffordshire Sentinel 
'Business Reference Guide to The Potteries, Newcastle & District'

The London Gazette
 January 1900 


Notice of the dissolution of the partnership between
Colin Mosley Brunt and John Brunt the younger 
and the late Peter Wagstaff (as Hay & Straw Merchants)

The business was continued by 
Colin Mosley Brunt and John Brunt 

 

 


The London Gazette
23rd January 1948
 


Notice of the dissolution of the partnership between
William Waterfield and Colin Mosley Brunt

The business carried on by Colin Mosley Brunt

 


The London Gazette
7th February 1980

 
Notice of the voluntary winding up
of Wagstaff and Brunt Limited

Colin M Brunt 


 

 


Church Street

Wagstaff & Brunt, 
china & earthenware merchants 


LONGTON
China, Glass & Warthenware merchants 
Wagstaff & Brunt, Church Street

 

from..... 1907 Staffordshire Sentinel 
'Business Reference Guide to The Potteries, Newcastle & District'

 


 


Wagstaff & Brunt
Richmond Pottery, Longton, Staff

1908 Advert 

Source: Grace's Guide

 


 


Transferware & gilt trio - Wagstaff & Brunt 

 


 


Commemorative plate 
1897
for the Diamond Jubilee reign of Queen Victoria

Wagstaff & Brunt
Longton

 




covered tureen in the Royal Derby pattern 

most likely Wagstaff & Brunt called this Imari Style pattern 'Royal Derby' in passing
reference to the Royal Crown Derby Porcelain Company


 

 


Commemorative mug 
May 1937
for the Coronation of King George VI

Wagstaff
&
Brunt
Longton
Made in
England

 

 


 

Marks & initials used on ware for identification:

 

WAGSTAFF & BRUNT
LONGTON


W & B
LONGTON


 


Wagstaff & Brunt
Longton


 


Wagstaff & Brunt
Longton
England

Royal Derby is the pattern name


 


Wagstaff
&
Brunt
Longton
Made in
England

 


 


Wagstaff
&
Brunt
Longton
All British

Made in
England


 


1877 map showing the Richmond Pottery 

"Robert Garner (173389) built a works on the north side of King Street on a site now enclosed by Clarence Road and Marsh Road, with a house (Bank House) adjoining to the east. (fn. 500) 

He was evidently the son of the Robert Garner who had been an apprentice to Thomas Whieldon at Fenton and later worked with the Barkers near the Foley. (fn. 501) His son, also Robert (born 1766), still held the works in 1821. (fn. 502) 

The works has been rebuilt and is now (1960) occupied by the Co-operative Wholesale Society's Crown Clarence Pottery (earthenware) and by Messrs. Wagstaff and Brunt, china and earthenware dealers, who were there as china and earthenware manufacturers by the 1880's. (fn. 503) The house was the home of Charles Harvey, banker and former potter, by the late 1820's (fn. 504) but is no longer standing."

Source: 'Longton', in A History of the County of Stafford: Volume 8, ed. J G Jenkins (London, 1963), pp. 224-246. 

References:

500. Mankowitz and Haggar, Eng. Pottery, 94; Shaw, Staffs. Potteries, 174; Jewitt, Ceramic Art, 55960, identifying Robt. Garner of Bank House and Robt. Garner of Fenton as the same man.
501. See p. 217.
502. Mankowitz and Haggar, Eng. Pottery, 94; Meigh, 'Staffs. Potters', 84.
503. Kelly's Dir. Staffs. (1884).
504. Shaw, Staffs. Potteries, 77.

 


 


1953 map - the manufactory has been renamed Clarence Works
Clarence Road and Richmond Road were built sometime between 1877 and 1900

 


 


Wagstaff & Brunt's Richmond Pottery on the corner of March Road and King Street, Longton.
December 1962

In the 1950s Richmond Road was renamed March Road and King Street was 
extended to include the portion previously called Church Street

photo: Mr Bert Bentley
Potteries PastTrack

 


 

 

 

 


Questions, comments, contributions? email: Steve Birks