the history of the Borough of Stoke-upon-Trent 

     

Rated property, dwelling houses and Elective Franchises:

 

 

Rated property, dwelling houses and Elective Franchises:
Source: "The Borough of Stoke-upon-Trent" John Ward, 1843

 

Rated property, dwelling houses and Elective Franchises:

 Table - shewing the superficial contents of the Borough, - the annual rated Value of the property,- the number of Dwelling-houses in 1838,- and the number of Persons returned on the Registers, as entitled to the Elective Franchise in 1832 and 1838:-

 

Townships

Acres

Property assessed 1837

Houses

Electors 1832

Electors 1838

Tunstall

800

13,451 4s 4d

1,370

96

115

Burslem, Sneyd and Rushton Grange

1,450

35,622 1s 0d *

2,748

357

394

Hanley and Shelton

1,530

35,629 16s 6d

4,082

405

534

Penkhull with Boothen,  (with Stoke)

1,660

 

33,933 6s 8d #

1,520

 

284

220

Fenton Vivian, and Fenton Culvert

1,620

934

95

Longton and Lane End

800

18,439 6s 8d

2,417

207

303

Totals:

7,860

137,075 15s 2d

13,071

1,349

1,661

* All the Coal Mines and Canal Property in the Parish (Abbey Hulton included) are comprised in this amount).

# This amount embraces all the Canal Property in Stoke Parish.  

Note: those persons, who by renting Tenements of Ten Pounds per Annum, or upwards, were first registered under the Reform Act in 1832.

 


footnote......

Reform Bill of 1832

The Reform Bill of 1832 provided for the redistribution of parliamentary seats, and virtually tripled the electorate. It disenfranchised 56 boroughs, among them the so-called rotten boroughs, some of which had no population at all, and those known as pocket boroughs, in which the number of representatives had been controlled by aristocratic landowners. The parliamentary representation of other boroughs was reduced, while that of a number of large towns and of the counties generally was increased. Representation in Ireland and Scotland was also increased. The electorate was broadened by the elimination or lessening of various restrictive residential requirements and financial qualifications.

On the whole, the Reform Bill of 1832 resulted in the transfer of political power from the landowning aristocrats to the middle class, and in the subordination of the House of Lords to the popular will.

 


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