a walk along the Caldon Canal

Eastwood, Hanley 

 


Previous: Mousecroft, Westwood

 

 

 

Eastwood, Hanley

The canal enters into the Eastwood, Joiners Square and Ivy House Estate area - which was a very industrial area with a number of large pottery companies. Some industry still remains. 

  • Bridge number 8 carries Lichfield Street over the Caldon Canal. 

 

 


the route of the Caldon Canal from Etruria to Froghall

 

The Eastwood area on the Caldon Canal
The Eastwood area on the Caldon Canal
Bridge number 8 carries Lichfield Street over the Caldon Canal

Google Maps


 

in this 1880 mapthe canal passes under Lichfield Street and enters Eastwood
in this 1880 map the canal passes under Lichfield Street and enters Eastwood

 

A large number of brickworks, mills and pottery factories surrounded the canal area
A large number of brickworks, mills and pottery factories surrounded the canal area

 

Lichfield Street as it passes over the canal
Lichfield Street as it passes over the canal
In purple is the Eastwood Works was built in 1887 by Charles Meakin 
- the works is now run by Emma Bridgwater, none of the bottle kilns remains.

Shown in green is the location of the former Bullers pottery factory - one of the bottle kilns
remains - it is partly enclosed in the foyer of a housing complex.   

Google Maps

 


 

the Eastwood Works of Charles Meakin - now operated by Emma Bridgewater
the Eastwood Works of Charles Meakin - now operated by Emma Bridgewater
fronting the factory is Lichfield Street running from Joiners Square at the bottom to Hanley at the top

 

The Eastwood Works, a Nineteenth Century version of the Eighteenth Century potworks model (it looks like a stretched version of Boundary Works), sits alongside the Caldon Canal - which was still used to transport ware to different parts of the site in relatively recent times - off Lichfield Street in Hanley. 

Eastwood Works was built in 1887 by Charles Meakin, and followed the late-Nineteenth Century trend of using iron beams and columns for support, and ensuring that rooms were larger than those in older potworks - the rooms at the Eastwood Works are 250 feet long - and larger windows and doors were used in order to create a greater sense of space and light. 

To the rear of the works stood a group of seven large bottle ovens known locally as 'the Seven Sisters'. However, the way in which the ovens were grouped meant that from whatever direction they were viewed, you could only see six at one time. The Seven Sisters have long since disappeared from the site, and just space remains.

 

 

The 'Seven Sisters' - J&G Meakins Eastwood Pottery
The 'Seven Sisters' - J&G Meakins Eastwood Pottery

photo: 1958 Donald Morris

The Caldon Canal ran in front of these amazing bottle kilns - although there
were seven kilns in the group, only six were ever visible to the viewer - 
no matter where you stood one or another was always hidden.

 

 

 

 

 


1907 advert for the Meakin Eagle and Eastwood Works

advert from..... 
1907 Staffordshire Sentinel 'Business Reference Guide to The Potteries, Newcastle & District'

 


 

 


 the Bridge public house on Lichfield Street c.1974
- the name of the pub comes from the bridge which carried Lichfield Street over the Caldon Canal -

the vast frontage of the Eastwood pottery factory casts a shadow across the road
in the right middle ground the Inland Revenue offices "Blackburn House" are being built

photo: Ken and Joan Davis c.1974

 


 

Advert for Bullers at their Joiners Square Works
Advert for Bullers at their Joiners Square Works 

from.... 
Prestige and Progress - A Survey of Industrial North Staffordshire
1955 publication of North Staffordshire Chamber of Commerce

 


 

 

Views from bridge No.8 on Lichfield Street 

 

 

Emma Bridgewater's Eastwood Pottery - on the right the bridge over the Caldon Canal
Emma Bridgewater's Eastwood Pottery - on the right the bridge over the Caldon Canal

 

 

view from the bridge - just past the loading point on the left stood the 'Seven Sisters' bottle kilns
view from the bridge - just past the loading point on the left stood the 'Seven Sisters' bottle kilns

 

on the opposite side of the canal to Bridgewaters is the bottle kiln of the former Bullers Works
on the opposite side of the canal to Bridgewaters is the bottle kiln of the former Bullers Works

 

 

Bridge No.8 in the foreground - in the background is Endeka Ceramics
Bridge No.8 in the foreground - in the background is Endeka Ceramics 
and to the right is the remains of George Goodwin's Westwood Mills

 

 

 

 


Previous: Mousecroft, Westwood

 

related pages 


The Eighth Sister

Emma Bridgewater, Hanley

Bullers works at Joiners Square