Stoke-on-Trent Local History

 

 

Sydney Malkin

 

Federation of the six towns
31st March 1910 saw the federation of the
six towns to form the County Borough of Stoke-on-Trent

 

 


next: Federation and the first meeting
previous: Malkin and Federation
contents: Index page for Federation

Sydney Malkin

Sydney Malkin -

The following sketch of Sydney Malkin's career was prepared around 1924/5 for his bid to become a Member of Parliament.

The photographs and maps have been added to give some context.


BURSLEM & TUNSTALL CONSTITUENCY

MR. S. MALKIN, J.P.

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LIBERAL AND UNIONIST CANDIDATE

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SKETCH OF HIS CAREER

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Manufacturer:  Former Mayor of Burslem:  Wesleyan:  Chamber of Commerce:  Work for the Crippled Children.

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  Mr. Sydney Malkin, J.P., The Limes, Porthill, Burslem, the "Coalition Liberal" candidate for the Burslem and Tunstall constituency, not only belongs to a family long and intimately associated with the industry and the religious and social life of the district, and with its Liberalism, but has distinguished himself locally by his public service in many directions, and is held in the highest respect and regard.

 He was adopted as Coalition Liberal candidate by the Liberals, and his candidature was whole-heartedly endorsed by the Unionists. He has been the official Coalition candidate since last December. With the resignation of the Coalition Government he has remained a National Liberal - the party led by Mr. Lloyd George and Mr. Winston Churchill; and there is every assurance that both on political and personal grounds, the local Unionists will heartily and unitedly continue to support him in keeping with the advice given to Unionists by Lord Derby in his speeches in at Manchester and Bolton and elsewhere.

 Most of the Liberals in the Burslem and Tunstall constituency belong to the National Liberal party, and there is no reason for doubting that Mr. Malkin will receive the votes of all Liberals, while he is also assured of support from amongst those who are supposed to be associated with the Labour Party.

The Liberal Club, Market Street, Burslem
The Liberal Club, Market Street, Burslem

date stone: AD1892
date stone: AD1892

The Liberal Club
The Liberal Club
mosaic on the pediment

 Politics apart, Mr. Malkin will undoubtedly receive very large support for local reasons - from the general public as a genial neighbour and fellow-townsman of the highest integrity, and from the business community because it is fully realised how qualified and able he is to voice the trade and municipal interests of the Potteries in the House of Commons and in the Government Departments. The writer says this all the more freely, and with all the more confidence, because nearly twenty years ago, after hearing Mr. Malkin speak at a public meeting in Burslem , he suggested in the columns of the "Sentinel" that if the local Liberals wanted a candidate, they would find one of unusual stability in Mr. Malkin. That opinion has only been confirmed, and with increased confidence, this the passing years.


Ancestry and old Associations

 There have been Malkins in the Potteries for three hundred years and more, and a branch of them went off to Leicestershire and founded a distinguished family there. Mr. Malkin's grandfather was a working potter, a dipper, who suffered from lead poisoning; he was maintained by his son, the late Mr. James Malkin, during his later years, and was buried in St. Paul's Church-yard, Burslem. Mr. Malkin's father (James Malkin) went as a lad to the Anderton Canal Carrying Company, of which the first Lord Loch was a director. Mr. James MacIntyre was manager, and when he went into the pottery trade, Mr. James Malkin succeeded him as manager.

 Mr. James Malkin (Mr. Sydney Malkin's father) married the eldest daughter of Joseph Edge. The Edges came from Horton, near Rudyard, where they occupied a considerable position; but they lost their prosperity, and one of them Joseph Edge (the great grandfather of Mr. Sydney Malkin) found himself as a youth derelict in Newcastle Street, Burslem. The anecdote has come down that he prayed for guidance as he walked, and that at that moment, a townsman saw him and had compassion on him, and took him home to his bakers' shop. When Joseph Edge's benefactor died he took over the business.

 This Joseph Edge had two sons and a daughter. One of the sons was Joseph and the other Stephen. Mr. J. Wilcox Edge, J.P., is the son of Joseph Edge, junior, while Mr. Rathbone Edge, M.A. formerly Radical M.P. for Newcastle, is the son of Stephen Edge. As Mr. Sydney Malkin's father married a daughter of Mr. Joseph Edge, junior, Mr. Wilcox Edge is the uncle of Mr. Sydney Malkin, and Mr. Rathbone Edge is the cousin of Mr. Sydney Malkin's mother. 

 It is not necessary to recall the long and valuable services of Mr. Wilcox Edge and Mr. Rathbone Edge to Liberalism and the Wesleyan Church and the public life of North Staffordshire. Mr. Wilcox Edge was one of the strongest political supporters of Mr. William Woodall (Liberal) and Mr. Henry Broadhurst (Labour) when they were elected for the undivided Parliamentary Borough of Stoke-on-Trent in 1880. Mr. Woodall subsequently represented the Burslem Division (consisting then of Hanley and Burslem) and Mr. Wilcox Edge has become the Grand Old Man" of North Staffordshire Liberalism, and of its municipal life. He remembers very well the visit of Mr. Gladstone, then Chancellor of the Exchequer, to Burslem, on October 26th 1863, to lay the foundation-stone of the Wedgwood Institute - just 59 years ago.

1851 map of Burslem Town Centre
1851 map of Burslem Town Centre
 
the Town Hall is marked in blue (standing next to the meat market)
the Cork, Edge & Malkin potworks on Queen Street is marked in red
the Queen's Head public house (still standing today) is marked in green

Cork, Edge & Malkin potworks on Queen Street
Cork, Edge & Malkin potworks on Queen Street
now the site of the art school

 

 Joseph Edge, jun., entered upon teapot making with Benjamin Cork, under the style of Cork and Edge, their factory standing on the site of the present Art School in Burslem. Mr. Cork was the father-in-law of the Rev. Frederick Wm. Macdonald, the well-known Wesleyan minister.  Mr. Sydney Malkin's father was carried on as Cork, Edge and Malkin. Mr. Cork returned, and the firm became Edge, Malkin and Co., at Newport Works.


Business Career

 Mr. Sydney Malkin was born at No.1 The Mount, Second Avenue, Porthill, on August 31st, 1865, and is therefore just over 57 years of age. He attended Mr. Osmond's school at Shelton, then the principal seminary of the district, and afterwards went to the Newcastle High School, 1879-81, in the late Mr. F.E. Kitchener's time. On leaving school he spent two years with the Manchester and Liverpool District Bank, at Burslem and Macclesfield, and then joined his father in the potting trade.

 He was travelling in America for the firm when his father died in 1894. Retiring from the firm of Edge, Malkin & Co., Mr. Sydney Malkin joined his brother, Mr. Elijah Malkin, in the firm of Malkin, Edge & Co., tile manufacturers, and when this was reconstructed in 1901, as the result of heavy and continuous work, he became managing director of the Malkin Tileworks Company Limited, Encaustic Tileworks, Burslem.

 

Edge & Malkin majolica pottery leaf plate
Edge & Malkin majolica pottery leaf plate
 

Edge & Malkin & Co
Edge & Malkin & Co
[impressed mark on the reverse of the plate]

Edge & Malkin & Co trade mark
Edge & Malkin & Co trade mark
used c.1873-1903

 

 Since that date his work has steadily prospered and he is now also the managing director of the Marsden Tile Company Ltd., Burslem, and a director of Oliver and Sons (Burslem) Ltd., flint millers, Newport Mills, Burslem; and of Jesshope Ltd., Engineers and Ironfounders, Dale Street, Burslem; and of Messrs H. Cordall, coopers, Burslem. Mr. Malkin is this associated with firms employing several hundred work people, by whom he is greatly esteemed.

 The firm has workpeople who have been with it for fifty years, and there are grand-children of some of those who started with him. The workpeople made a handsome presentation to him on his marriage.

the calcining kilns of Oliver & Sons
the calcining kilns of Oliver & Sons

 In the course of his business career, Mr. Malkin has travelled extensively. During a journey round the world, in 1904, he was in Pekin, and he heard the guns firing at the Battle of Port Arthur, in the Russian-Japanese War. He has been six time round the world, and in addition to travels in Europe, he has been in America, Canada, Russia, the Malay Straits, Burma, Australia, etc. He is therefore particularly well informed on home, Imperial, and international trade and Imperial and world politics, very useful and valuable in a member of Parliament, and his experience has constantly confirmed his faith in the principle of Free Trade. Relatives of his carry on a large business in Vancouver.


Public Work

Burslem School Board
Burslem School Board

 Mr. Malkin began his public work as a member of the old Burslem School Board, being elected for the South Ward along with the late Mr. James Bowden. He was very energetic in the cause of education. Joining the Burslem Town Council, he was the first Chairman of the Electricity Committee, and was Chairman of the Finance Committee for some years. He was Mayor of Burslem in 1907-8, and was made a Justice of the Peace for Burslem.

 

the New Town Hall for Burslem
Postcard of Queen's Hall
the New Town Hall for Burslem

 When the Federation of the six Potteries towns into the County Borough of Stoke-on-Trent was approached, he promoted the building of the New Town Hall for Burslem, to assist in preserving the individuality of the Mother Town. Successfully carried the scheme through in spite of opposition, and the results have fully justified his efforts, for the Old Town Hall has become useless, while the New Town Hall may be said to be crowded every night, and without it Burslem would have been at a serious disadvantage. There has been some slight damage from undermining, of course, as in the case of other buildings in the town, but the necessary repairs are being made, and the New Town Hall will remain for generations, a testimony to the public spirit, foresight, and energy of Mr. Malkin.

 

 Mr. Malkin joined the Stoke-on-Trent County Borough Council on its formation, as a representative of Burslem, and was appointed an Alderman. He also became Chairman of the Watch Committee, and a member of the Finance Committee etc. When the Water Company promoted a Bill in Parliament, Mr. Malkin wished the Stoke-on-Trent Council to insert a right-of-purchase clause.

 This was opposed by the late Ald. Geen, then Mayor, whose ruling led Mr. Malkin to resign his Aldermanship, with a view to having a municipal contest in Burslem on the question. Mr. Malkin's idea was that a Burslem councillor would be appointed to the vacant Aldermanship, and that he would then contest the seat. But Ald. Geen got the late Major Cecil Wedgwood appointed to the vacant Aldermanship for Hanley, so that a vacancy did not arise in Burslem, and Mr. Malkin's municipal work came to an end, particularly as the War came on, and he gave himself to public work to other directions.

 


Politics

 Mr. Malkin is a life-long Liberal, and began in his youth by supporting Messrs. Woodall and Broadhurst, giving his support later to the late Mr. Enoch Edwards, while he also joined in the adoption of Mr. Outhwaite as Liberal candidate for Hanley and Burslem. He is a member of the National Liberal Club and the 1920 Club, and he was also a member of the movement known as the "Liberal Forwards." He has always supported Liberal and Democratic principles and measures.

 It may be recalled here that some years ago, it was thought that an Educational Bill unfairly enables denominational schools to share in the rates. Nonconformists protested by means of what was known as "passive resistance" - when paying rates they deducted and refused to pay the portion said to be for the endowment of denominational education. They were summoned for non-payment, and their goods were distrained upon. Mr. Malkin underwent this experience, after a speech at Burslem Police Court in response to the summons; but having thus formally joined in the protest, he was content afterwards, as a law-abiding and sensible citizen, to obey the law until amended by Parliament.


The Wesleyan Church

 The Malkins and Edges have always been devoted Wesleyans, associated with the Burslem Church. Mr. Malkin held all offices, including those of Sunday School teacher and superintendent, he has been a lay preacher in the Burslem Circuit for 38 years. He was Circuit Steward for six years, including the difficult period of the War.

The War

 During the War, Mr. Malkin devoted himself to the National cause, being responsible for important administrative work, with the rank of Lieutenant. Three of his four sons were eligible for service and they served. Two were in France and the third, unfit for general service, did duty in this country. One son was gazetted to the 12th London as medical officer, and served in France. Another son enlisted in the 5th North Staffords in August 1914, and afterwards received a commission. The third son joined as a gunner on the day he was eighteen, and was in France with his battery.

Chamber of Commerce

 Mr. Malkin has been a member of the North Staffordshire Chamber of Commerce for many years, and was President during the War. As a representative of the Chamber of Commerce, and also a representative of the pottery trade, he has been brought in touch with Government Departments, particularly in connection with the safe-guarding of the pottery trade during the War. Lead, for instance, was rationed, and concessions were sought, so as to interfere with the trade and employment as little as possible. The supply of liquid gold was also curtailed, and this again was looked into, so that decorative work could proceed. During the War also, the importation of pottery into this country was prohibited. This was all very well; but the State officials made this apply to broken samples sent to be matched, a prohibition that made for the unnecessary and irritating restriction of the English pottery trade, and Mr. Malkin joined in calling attention to the need for a commonsense application of the law.

 Mr. Stanley Baldwin, the Chancellor of the Exchequer in the new Government, was one of the Government officials whom Mr. Malkin met at that time. But while such details were needed discussing, Mr. Malkin, knowing trade and foreign trade so well, partly through being an exporter himself, remains a Free Trader. One one occasion, he told the Chamber of Commerce, "We have stood with our backs to the cupboard in which our principles are locked up, long enough; let us take them out and examine them anew." But while always ready to make an all-round examination of political and economic problems, to keep up-to-date, he nevertheless is only confirmed by experience in his attachment to Free Trade, as best for trade and for the workers and the public.


The Haywood Hospital

Haywood Hospital
Haywood Hospital
in 2000

 Mr. Malkin's association with philanthropic work began when he was a member of the Burslem Town Council. He was appointed a Governor of the Haywood Hospital, and he found that there was an imperative need for further accommodation, both for patients and nurses. The day and night nurses slept in the same beds. He proposed the first enlargement scheme, and the money was raised, and it was carried through.

 

The Crippled Children's Hospital

 Mr. Malkin, as is so gratefully recognised, has been a moving spirit in the work of providing facilities for the treatment of crippled children in North Staffordshire, and the founding and development of the N.S. Cripples' Aid Society's Hospital at Hartshill.

North Staffordshire Cripples' Aid Society's Hospital at Hartshill
North Staffordshire Cripples' Aid Society's Hospital at Hartshill
[later used as a maternity block to the main hospital - now demolished]

 

 It was when he was mayor of Burslem that his attention was first drawn to the subject. Finding that there was a list of 56 cripples in Burslem, he visited each home at Christmas and left a little present, and found that there were other cripples mot on the books. The centre for the work was the at Hanchurch, and it was suggested by Miss May that much more could be done if the treatment could be given in the Potteries instead of so far away as Hanchurch.

 The Record of Stoke and Mr. Malkin became jointly responsible for taking a house in Wodehouse Street, Stoke, and this was no sooner done, that the place was besieged by mothers bringing their crippled children there for treatment. Within three months, Mr. Malkin looked round for more commodious premises, and finding Longfields, at Hartshill, for sale, he personally took an option on it, and then went round to his friends and raised the money and bought the place for the N.S. Cripples' Aid Society. He then took a leading part in procuring the alterations and the later extensions, being the Chairman of the House Committee; and then the ladies of the district promoted the wonderful bazaar that realised 13,000 and paid of the debt. 


Marriage

In 1891, Mr. Malkin married Miss Edith Jordan Stormer, of Luton, and there are four sons. Two of them are in business with their father, and the other two have taken up medicine. Mr. and Mrs. Malkin shared in the war-time efforts of the Red Cross, and Mrs. Malkin has also been specially interested in temperance work. She provided the coffee stall at Swan Bank, Burslem, for the convenience of tramcar men and other workers, and when its success was assured, Mrs. Malkin handed it over to the British Women's Temperance Association, under whose auspices it is continued.

 When he was at school, Mr. Malkin played Rugby football. He now plays gold and tennis, and he is a vice-president of the Middleport Bowling Club. Living in his earlier years at the Mount, Porthill, and then at Heatherlea, Park Avenue, Wolstanton, Mr. and Mrs. Malkin went to live in Cobridge during their early married life, but took the Limes, Porthill, some fifteen years ago.

Conclusion

 Mr. Malkin has a brisk, polished and genial personality, full of earnestness and kindliness. He is a Burslem man, a Burslem manufacturer, who would voice local sentiments and interests in the House of Commons and in Government Departments with intimate knowledge. But while so intensely local, he also takes "the world for his parish," and is thus doubly qualified in in these respects to be a member of Parliament for a manufacturing and exporting district.

He is a ready, resourceful, and agreeable speaker, as those who are familiar with his work as a Wesleyan local preacher, President of the Chamber of Commerce, municipal representative, and Parliamentary candidate, are well aware. There may be differences of view on political theories; but while Mr. Malkin has the official and cordial support of the Liberal and Unionist parties, there is probably also general agreement that upon personal grounds at any rate he has exceptionally satisfactory qualifications to be a local member of Parliament for a local constituency. 

 


next: Federation and the first meeting
previous: Malkin and Federation
contents: Index page for Federation