Stoke-on-Trent Local History

      

  

 Newcastle Workhouse


 
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 Newcastle Workhouse

Newcastle Workhouse was no more pleasant than the other two. The diet was monotonous and barely adequate (though in that respect it was probably little different than that of many outside), but the regimentation and discipline were strong deterrents to potential applicants.


Food in the Workhouse - Extracts from the Rules of Trentham Workhouse 1810
 

The Governor and Matron shall allot the quantity of provision for each day's consumption agreeable to the following Bill of Fare, shall see them weighed, and properly dressed and distributed.

Sunday:    Broth - meat and potatoes -peas, soup.
Monday:   Rice, milk - soup and bread and cheese - mashed potatoes.
Tuesday:  Broth - pork and pease pudding or bacon broth.
                  Wednesday:  Milk, porridge - meat and potatoes or bacon and
                  vegetables-broth.
Friday:      Rice and milk - Ox cheek or legs of beef with potatoes - broth.
Saturday: Milk porridge - a clearance of what has been cooked made
                  with bread and cheese - rice milk.

Quantity:

Breakfast: A pint of milk porridge or broth with eight ounces of bread to each adult; children in proportions.

Dinner: Nine ounces of meat, six ounces of bread, roots or greens to each adult. Working boys and girls, five ounces of meat, four ounces of bread with roots and greens. NB. The younger children drink water. Bread and cheese dinner; twelve ounces of bread and six ounces of cheese, adults; eight ounces of bread and four ounces of cheese, boys and girls.

Supper: A pint of broth or soup, nine ounces of bread, adults. Children in proportion. Potato suppers; a trencher full mashed with milk and a pint of beer. NB. To prevent the trouble of weighing each separate mess, when one has been weighed, the rest are ascertained by bulk.

from: Exploring the Potteries


Deaths of Audley people in Newcastle Workhouse: 

Date of death

Name

Age

Comments

05.04.1870

Hadgett, Mary

94

buried by her friends - we gave the coffin

28.04.1870

Taylor, Charles

22

 

08.04.1870

Booth, Hannah

1 mth

 

26.05.1871

Gleaves, Eliza

27

 

03.10.1871

Rock, Edward

69

 

09.11.1871

Proctor, William

70

 

04.01.1872

Ins, Ann

46

 

07.01.1872

Hancock, Elizabeth

81

 

11.01.1872

Dobson, William

66

buried by his friends

07.02.1872

Hill, Mary

3 mth

 

25.03.1872

Hooley, Thomas

54

 

21.10.1872

Beech, Ann

58

 

02.04.1873

Swann, Thomas

32

buried by his friends

04.06.1873

Darlington, Jane

86

 

18.11.1873

Lockett, Ann

73

buried by her friends

 

"A pauper funeral was something to be avoided, not only because of its extreme simplicity but also for its significance in exhibiting one's failure to maintain a position, however lowly, in society. The covered hand-cart pushed along by a hunched-up attendant with the undertaker striding out in front and the mourners hurrying along behind, made a pathetic accompaniment to the children's rhyme, "Rattle his bones over the stones; he's only a pauper who nobody owns"

. Often the poor would deprive themselves of the necessities of life for the sake of paying respect to the bodies of their departed friends.

(from J. Litten, The English Way of death).

 

 Births in Newcastle Workhouse, parent admitted from Audley Parish 

Date of birth

Parent

Child

Comment

07.07.1867

Brownsett, Eliza

William

the 4th illegitimate child

18.08.1867

Griffith, Hannah

Ellen

 

03.09.1867

Bagguley, Mary

Thomas

 

18.10.1867

Buckley, Ann

 

child died in about 1 hr. after its birth

06.05.1868

Jones, Hannah

James

 

11.12.1868

Davis, Jane

Elizabeth

Illegitimate

03.01.1869

Stanyer, Martha

James

Illegitimate

18.10.1869

Robinson, Mary

Robert

Illegitimate

18.04.1869

Bolton, Eliza

Emma

Illegitimate

18.05.1870

Brownsword, Ann

Charles

Illegitimate

14.02.1871

Norcup, Ann

Alice

 

25.10.1871

Brownsett, Eliza

John

Illegitimate

 

 
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Updated 30 Nov 2008