Railways of Stoke-on-Trent - Potteries Loop Line
 

   

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Potteries Loop Line


next: Tunstall Branch Line
previous:
Pinnox Junction
[contents: Tunstall, Newfields, Pinnox]


Tunstall - Pinnox Potters

A number of pottery works existed in the Pinnox area

Richardson's pottery factory, Pinnox Street - 1960
Richardson's pottery factory, Pinnox Street - 1960

photo: Gladstone Pottery Museum Photographic Collection (Mr Mountford)
Staffordshire Past Tracks


 

Aerial view of Pinnox factory 
Aerial view of Pinnox factory 
(around 1953)

"Upon transfer to the Pinnox Works in Tunstall in 1903... "The manufacture of general earthenware was abandoned, and the new plant was devoted exclusively to the production of tiles, except for a small amount of sanitary ware made, until 1925, on behalf of the sister house of Edward Johns & Co."

From: "A Century of Progress 1837-1937" a publication to commemorate The Centenary of Richards Tiles Ltd.

 

The corner of the Pinnox Works on Scotia Road, Tunstall
The corner of the Pinnox Works on Scotia Road, Tunstall

The photo is taken looking through the span of a railway mineral-line (the bridge, of which, runs along the top of the photo) the street running to the left (between Walter Sylvesters and the Potworks) is Williamson Street.
The Asda supermarket has replaced the potworks and a mini-roundabout has replaced the junction between Scotia Road and Williamson Street.
Nearby are still Pinnox Street and Railway Street as a reminder to features now disappeared.


a Sylvester

"During the late nineteenth century the commonest type of a fatal mine accident was a roof collapse caused by knocking out the pit props with a sledgehammer. In order to try and counter this problem, Walter Sylvester, who worked for a colliery in North Staffordshire, invented a ratcheted pulling device, which could be attached to the pit props by a long chain and used to haul them out without any danger to the operator. It could also be used for pulling trucks and other heavy items, and tightening-up cables. It was patented in 1895; known locally as a "Walter" it soon became widely used in mining and other industries as the "Sylvester", and was still made under that name until the 1970s. The use of a Sylvester for safety was made mandatory by the Coal Mine Act of 1911. However modern mining techniques eventually made them superfluous, also they could be dangerous if used improperly, and they were eventually banned by the Coal Board in 1978."

From: RRCPC Newsletter, Volume 38 Number 2 Article 1 - May 2001


G. Podmore, Walker & Co. took over the Unicorn Pottery and Pinnox Works in Tunstall in 1834. 

Earthenware manufacturers at Well Street (c.1843-53), at Amicable Street - Pinnox Works (c.1850-59) and Swan Bank (c.1835-59), Tunstall, Stoke-on-Trent

In 1860 the Amicable Street - Pinnox Works was continued by Wedgwood & Co
 




next: Tunstall Branch Line
previous:
Pinnox Junction
[contents: Tunstall, Newfields, Pinnox]