Stoke-on-Trent - photo of the week


contents: 2011 photos


click for
previous
photos

Advert of the Week
Potworks of the Week


Grafton Junior and Infants School, Longton

 

Grafton Junior and Infants School, Marlborough Road, Longton
Grafton Junior and Infants School, Marlborough Road, Longton

 

Grafton Junior and Infants School was opened in the Sunday- school buildings of Zion Chapel in 1872 - originally as a boys' school, it had a  small attendance and so arrangements were made to take 137 boys from the private school of Josiah Ball (at St. John's Church) which was overcrowded.

In 1892 Longton School Board erected new buildings the Girls' and infants' departments were opened in the December of 1892. 

Grafton Infants merged with Queen's Primary in Fenton in 2004 to form Clarice Cliff Primary. The schools initially operated from both sites before moving to a new site in Goldenhill in February 2008. 

The Grafton School building in Marlborough Road has remained derelict since then. In October 2010 it was subject to an arson attack. 

Victoria History of the County of Stafford
Sentinel Newspaper

 

The Boys Entrance in Grafton Road
The Boys Entrance in Grafton Road 

 


Longton School Board
Longton School Board

 

 

teracotta vase on the apex of the school
teracotta vase on the apex of the school

 

Grafton Nursery
Grafton Nursery

 

 

Infants Entrance
Infants Entrance

 

Girls Entrance - Clarice Cliff Primary School (Grafton Site)
Girls Entrance - Clarice Cliff Primary School (Grafton Site)

 

Memory of a pupil of Grafton Road School....

"I was born in Wood Street, Longton, 87 years ago and spent many years in the area at the time before the war.

My family all lived in one of five one up, one down houses that had a water tap on a wall outside. We all had to bathe in a large zinc tub on the hearth in front of the fire if we had got any coal to put on it. Coal was only 10p old money, 1 CWT (50.8kg) for nuts and slack.

Holly Lane was the very best quality coal at 1/6 per CWT. We had a communal toilet for us and four other families and we had to carry our own water there. And of course our toilet paper was the good old Sentinel. We couldn't afford to buy soft paper.

I was educated at Grafton Road and Woodhouse Schools until my folks were lucky enough to get a council house in Meir Square and then we went to Leason Road, Meir.

By that time my mother had nine children four boys, five girls. My dad was on the dole most of the time as he was an ex-miner and had poor health, but we were a happy family.

Where we used to live in Wood Street was demolished and on the spot was built the New Ashwood Hotel. The war came along and then we went on our own separate ways.

My eldest brother joined the RAF and spent the rest of the war mostly abroad. I had a spell on munitions and then had to go into the army when my age group came along. We all did our share."

Sentinel Newspaper

 


contents: 2011 photos


 

 

Related pages..


Dame Schools and education in The Potteries

Education and Schools in The Potteries - part of Samuel Scriven's 1840 report to the House of Commons commission in to child employment.

 


Advert of the Week
Potworks of the Week