Stoke-on-Trent - Potworks of the week


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Longport Pottery on Davenport Street, Trubshaw Cross (Longport), Burslem

In 1773, a manufactory was erected at Longport by John Brindley (brother of  the celebrated James Brindley, the engineer), who also built for himself a handsome residence near at hand. 

Shortly after 1773, Edward Bourne built another manufactory; and this was followed by a third, erected by Robert Williamson.

In 1793, the first-named manufactories passed into the hands of John Davenport, who, in 1797, added to his other operations 'the chemical preparation of litharge and white lead for the use of potters', which, however, was afterwards discontinued. 

In 1801, the business of glass-making was added. In about 1830, Mr. Davenport retired from active business and chiefly resided at Westwood Hall, near Leek, where he died in 1848. 

  • The business, after his retirement in 1830, was carried on by his second son. Henry Davenport (who died in 1835), and the youngest son, William Davenport. Henry Davenport purchased the manufactory of Robert Williamson, and added to his other works. 

  • After the death of Henry Davenport, the manufactories were carried on by his youngest brother, William Davenport, under the style of W. Davenport & Co. He died in 1869 and the entire business was carried on by his son, Henry Davenport, until September 1881, when he converted it into a private company - Davenport's Ltd.

  • Production ceased - by Davenport's - (after some years of trouble) in 1887, and the works were purchased by Thomas Hughes.

Jewitt's Ceramic Art of Great Britain 1800-1900

  • Thomas Hughes operated as an earthenware manufacturer at Waterloo Road, Burslem (c.1860-76) and then at the Top Bridge Works, Lonport, Burslem (c.1872-94). 

  • He moved to the nearby Longport Pottery after purchasing it from Davenport's - he named it Unicorn Pottery and operated here as Thomas Hughes & Son Ltd.

  • The business remained in the control of the Hughes family until it ceased trading in 1957.

  • The Unicorn Pottery was taken over by Arthur Wood & Sons (Lonport) Ltd. the other occupant of the historic Davenport Works site.

A Handbook of British Pottery 1900-2010 - Michael Perry

 

 


the Davenport family operated at these works in Longport until 1887
the Davenport family operated at these works in Longport until 1887
photo kindly supplied by Brian Stanyer

most of works were demolished c.1959/60 in just over two months
by
DEMCO DEMOLITIONS
The Grange, Cobridge, Stoke-on-Trent
Prop. Mr. W. Stanyer

a few workshops were retained and continued to be
operated by Arthur Wood


 

Longport Pottery on Davenport Street, Trubshaw Cross c.1890
Longport Pottery on Davenport Street, Trubshaw Cross c.1890
photo: Warrillow collection


The view above shows the frontage of Longport Pottery on Davenport Street from Trubshaw Cross. On the left was Longport House, the home of John Davenport before he moved to Newport House and then Westwood Hall near Leek.

Just beyond the house was the three-story factory entrance shown in more detail in the photograph here. Here next to the main entrance was the factory office which was directly accessible from Longport House (see 1851 map of Longport Pottery).

Most of these buildings, with the exception of some at the northern end of the works, used by Arthur Wood, have since been demolished.


Arthur Wood's Teapots occupied the remains of the Longport Pottery works
Arthur Wood's Teapots occupied the remains of the Longport Pottery works

 

 



Just beyond the house was the three-story factory entrance shown above
 

 


Frontage of old offices at Trubshaw Cross which are similar
in style as the Longport Pottery offices which were just across the road

 


1851 Ordnance Survey Map showing the Longport Pottery
1851 Ordnance Survey Map showing the Longport Pottery