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Neville Malkin's "Grand Tour" of the Potteries

buildings of Etruria
 


next:  The Bridge Inn
previous:  Wedgwood's Etruria Hall
contents: index of buildings in Etruria

 

No 57 -  The Roundhouse


Round House at Wedgwood's Etruria works

photo:  Mr Clive Shenton   - Aug 2001

Round House, formerly part of the Wedgwood Pottery works, and built circa 1769. Brick with plain tiled roof.

Circular in plan, on 2 storeys, with ground floor entrance and a series of windows with flat arched gauged brick heads, some blocked, and not all on the same level. Oculi to first floor.

Said to have been used variously for grinding raw materials, as a counting house, and as a stable.


The roundhouse at Wedgwood Etruria Works
The roundhouse at Wedgwood Etruria Works
pen drawing by Neville Malkin - May 1974

 

Roundhouse on the side of the Trent and Mersey Canal
Roundhouse on the side of the Trent and Mersey Canal
in the background is Shelton Iron and Steel works

photo: Ken Cubley

 

"This neglected building, with round windows and tiled dome roof, represents the last remaining link with the famous Etruria pottery of the first Josiah Wedgwood, but what it was used for remains a mystery.

In 1766 Josiah purchased the Ridge House Estate for 3,000 and began building a new home and factory in what were then rural surroundings. The factory was called Etruria, after the old Etruscan pottery in Italy, and opened on June 13th, 1769. A further development of this complex was the building of a village and school for his workers.

Probably Josiah's greatest contribution to the industry was the invention of Jasper in 1774, and his most successful work, the Portland Vase, in 1790. The adoption of a classical theme for his Jasper ware contributed to the fashion of that period, harmonising with the work of contemporary architects and designers. In 1790 he went into semi- retirement, but his health progressively worsened and he died on January 3rd, 1795, aged 64. His second son, Josiah II, a partner in the firm since 1790, inherited the works and estate of 380 acres.

The factory finally ceased production in 1940 when new premises were opened at Barlaston." 


Neville Malkin 1
5th
May 1974

 


 


photo of the roundhouse which clearly shows the subsidence which has resulted 
in the roundhouse being below the canal level
[in the background is the Shelton Steel Works]

photo: 1976 Ken Cubley

 

 

 


 


next:  The Bridge Inn
previous:  Wedgwood's Etruria Hall
contents: index of buildings in Etruria

 


 

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