Longton Hall Porcelain

Longton Hall Porcelain

Longton Hall porcelain, a soft-paste English porcelain produced for only about 10 years (1749-60). It is both heavy and translucent but has many faults both in potting and glazing. Its typical colours are a pale yellow-green, pink, strong red, crimson, and dark blue.

of Longton Hall

The factory was established in Staffordshire by William Littler. Its mark consists of crossed L's with three dots in blue; most pieces, however, are unmarked.

Between about 1749 and 1753, Longton produced a series of figures derived from Chinese, Meissen, and Chelsea originals and known as "snowmen" because of their blurred outline (the result of overthick glazing). The factory also made tableware that was moulded instead of thrown and was decorated in cobalt, or "Littler's blue."

Between 1754 and 1757 Littler's blue softened into powder blue, and tureens, sauceboats, and platters emerged from Longton Hall in the shape of cauliflowers, cabbages, and lettuces. During this period, William Duesbury, who subsequently founded Derby, enameled some Longton Hall ware.

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