Stoke-on-Trent, England - home of the North Staffordshire Potteries

 

| back to index of marks |

 

 

 

| Index for Royal Coat of Arms on Pottery |

 

American Potters use of the British Royal Coat of Arms

 


 

 
previous: English potters using Royal Arms

 


 

 

 

American Potters use of the British Royal Coat of Arms:

Until the late 19th century, most dinnerware in the US was imported.  However, in the 1870s and 1880s, several American potters began to make white "granite ware." 

Several potteries were situated in New Jersey, including City Pottery in Trenton, other potteries were also established near East Liverpool, Ohio, including Knowles, Taylor & Knowles and Homer Laughlin & Co. 

Most of the ironstone produced in the US had simpler shapes than the English imports which were still preferred by Americans. 

In an attempt to sell more of their wares, most American potteries did not originally mark their wares, and some used variations the British Royal Arms or marks that resembled the arms.

As well as the British Royal Arms of some American potters also included such phrases as 'Royal China' 'Royal Blue' 'Royal Semi-Granite' 'Imperial China' in order to give the appearance of English manufactured ware. 


As the quality of American made pottery increased people became more confident in purchasing American ware there was a transition from the use of the British Royal Arms to the use of the American Eagle, the Arms of the State of New Jersey.


Also see: 'Pottery Works at East Liverpool, Ohio, USA'


 

 

American Crockery Co
Iron Stone China
A.C.Co
 

American Crockery Co
Trenton, New Jersey

In 1876 the American Crockery Company was manufacturing white ironstone ware.

They made use of the British Royal Coat of Arms with the Lion, Unicorn, Shield and both mottos.

 



American China Co.

American China Co.
Extra Quality 
Ironstone China
A C Co
Warranted

American China Co.
Toronto, Ohio

Use of part of British Royal Coat of Arms with the Lion, Unicorn - with the letters A C Co in the Shield.

 



James Carr
Trade mark
JC
Stone China 


James Carr
New York Pottery

Use of part of British Royal Coat of Arms with the Lion, Unicorn - with letters "JC" in the Shield.

 




Iron Stone China
Warranted
F. & T. Co

Fell & Thropp Company
Trenton, New Jersey

Fell & Thropp operated the old Taylor & Speeler pottery, known as the Trenton Pottery. 

Use of part of British Royal Coat of Arms with the Lion, Unicorn.




CPCo
Mellor & Co

Mellor and Company
Cook Pottery Company
Trenton, New Jersey

In 1894 the Cook Pottery Co. were sucessors of Ott & Brewer at the 
Etruria Pottery - some of the Mellor marks had the name 'ETRURIA' 

Use of the British Royal Coat of Arms with the Lion, Unicorn and mottos. The monogram of the Cook Pottery Company in the centre. 




Ironstone China
E
E.T.O. Co

East Trenton Pottery Co
Trenton, New Jersey

In 1888 they were producing ware using a mark of the Arms of the State of New Jersey. On white ironstone a variation of the British Royal Arms was used.

Use of part of British Royal Coat of Arms with the Lion, Unicorn, but with letters in the Shield but both mottos.

 




GP
Ironstone China
J. M. & Co 


GP
Ironstone China
J. M. & S. Co

John Moses & Co
John Moses & Sons Co
Glasgow Pottery
Trenton, New Jersey

Use of part of British Royal Coat of Arms with the Lion, Unicorn, but with letters in the Shield but both mottos.

 




Warranted
O&B
Ironstone China


Warranted
O&B
Ironstone China
Etruria Pottery


Etruria Works
Ironstone China

Ott & Brewer
Etruria Pottery
Trenton, New Jersey

This company was founded in 1863 by William Bloor following earlier efforts in Trenton and East Liverpool. 
In 1865, it was known as Bloor, Ott & Brewer. Bloor remained the senior member of the firm until 1871. Upon his departure, the firm 'was renamed Ott & Brewer.

In an attempt to capitalise on the popularity of English ironstone and earthenware Bloor (and his successors) named their factory "Etruria Works" (after the Etruria Works of Josiah Wedgwood in Stoke-on-Trent, England) 

They also used various style of the British Royal Arms.

They were succeeded by The Cook Pottery Company who retained the name 'Etruria'

 

see Ott & Brewer's use of the name "ETRURIA WORKS" 



George Scott
Stone China
George Scott


George Scott
Cincinnati, Ohio

Use of part of British Royal Coat of Arms with the Lion, Unicorn, but with letters "GS" in the Shield and only one motto.

 



Tempest, Brockman & Co.
T. B. & Co 


Tempest, Brockman & Co.
Cincinnati, Ohio

Use of the full British Royal Coat of Arms with the Lion, Unicorn, Shield and both mottos.

 



Vodry & Brothers
Iron Stone China
V&B
Warranted 


Vodry & Brothers
East Liverpool, Ohio

Use of part of British Royal Coat of Arms with the Lion, Unicorn, but with letters "V&B" in the Shield and no mottos.

 




W
Warranted

often the mark has W.M.Co underneath  

Willets Manufacturing Company 
Trenton, New Jersey

In 1879 the business of William Young & Sons was sold to the Willets Manufacturing Company




Iron Stone China
W Y S

William Young & Sons
Trenton, New Jersey

From 1858 to 1879 their mark included the British Royal Coat of Arms

William Young was employed by John Ridgway, of Shelton, Hanley, England. He afterwards went into business for himself and subsequently emigrated to the USA.

 

 

 

 

American Potters start to use American symbols on their ware:

As the quality of American made pottery increased people became more confident in purchasing American ware there was a transition from the use of the British Royal Arms to the use of the American Eagle, the Arms of the State of New Jersey.

Homer Laughlin & Co even used a mark which depicted the American Eagle attacking the English Lion.

 

 

 

John Moses & Co
John Moses & Co
Glasgow Pottery
Trenton, New Jersey

Later John Moses mark with the American Eagle


Homer Laughlin & Co
Homer Laughlin & Co
East Liverpool, Ohio

Mark showing the "American Eagle" attacking the "British Lion"


Wheeling Pottery Co.

Wheeling Pottery Co.
Wheeling, West VA

Wheeling mark with the American Eagle

 

 


 

 
previous: English potters using the Royal Arms

 


 

 

| Index for Royal Coat of Arms on Pottery |

 

 

 

  Questions, comments, contributions? email: Steve Birks