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Neville Malkin's "Grand Tour" of the Potteries

buildings South of the Potteries


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contents: index of buildings south of the Potteries

 

No 8 - St. John's Church, Barlaston
 

St. John's Church is situated close to Barlaston Hall.
St. John's Church is situated close to Barlaston Hall.

The earliest part of the church is the tower, dating from the twelfth century; the remainder of the church was rebuilt in 1888.

Set into the south wall is a sundial, inscribed 'J. Aston, Church Warden'. Inside are memorials to the Wedgwood family.

The building was closed in 1980 after subsidence caused cracks in the masonry.

Photograph by courtesy of the Trustees of the Wedgwood Museum,
Barlaston, Stoke-on-Trent, Staffordshire.

Staffordshire Past Tracks
 

 

St. John's Church, Barlaston
St. John's Church, Barlaston
pen drawing by Neville Malkin - July 1975

 

"Just south of the city is the sandstone church of St. John, Barlaston, which, along with its next door neighbour Barlaston Hall, presents one of the most picturesque architectural duos in the area. The church is in well-kept grounds among a profusion of trees.

The only remaining part of an earlier church is the west tower, which probably dates from the 1200s; the main body was completely rebuilt in 1886-8. On the north side of the tower a very good vestry was added in 1969. There is a beautifully simple and straightforward sundial set into the south wall which, I would imagine, was rescued from some earlier building. It has incised Roman numerals and the inscription, J. Aston, Church Warden.

The earliest reliable mention I could find concerning a church or chapel at Barlaston occurs in a privilege granted by the Pope in 1162 which confirms the status and possessions of Trentham Priory, with the parish church of Trentham and its dependencies heading the priory's possessions; these dependencies included Barlaston, Betley, etc.
Understandably, the canons were careful to protect their major source of income, but, as time went by, many wealthy landowners sought to build new chapels; by the early 13th century, Barlaston, which was part of Trentham parish, had its own chapel in the patronage of the Lord of the Manor.

In 1225 the advowson of this chapel was granted by John fitz Philip, to the canons on the understanding that they maintained a resident chaplain at Barlaston to celebrate divine service, bury the dead, and baptise the children of parishioners."

Neville Malkin 23rd July 1975

 


St. John's Church, Barlaston
St. John's Church, Barlaston
The church was closed due to mining subsidence and a new church
with the same dedication built at a different site in the village.

photo: Geoff Pick  May 2003
and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence

 

the new St. John the Baptist parish church
the new St. John the Baptist parish church

Green Lane, Barlaston
photo - 2000

 

"Barlaston, a well-built village, with a railway station, is delightfully seated near the summit of a lofty declivity, on the east side of the vale of the Trent, and three miles N of Stone, and five miles SE by S of Newcastle. Its parish contains 591 inhabitants and 2087 acres of enclosed land, with 60 acres of waste.
RT Adderley, Esq, is owner of a great part of the soil, and lord of the manor, which his father obtained in marriage with one of the co-heiresses of the late Thomas Mills, Esq. His residence is Barlaston Hall, a handsome mansion near the north end of the village, commanding an extensive view of Trent Vale.
Barlaston New Hall is the handsome seat of Francis Wedgwood, Esq, late of Etruria.
Dr Ramage, Mrs Morgan, Mrs Aston, and several smaller owners have estates here. Hartwell is an ancient moated house, one mile north, and Parkfield is a hamlet of pleasant houses, on a terrace above the Trent, on the west side of the parish.

Barlaston Church, dedicated to St John the Baptist, stands near the hall, and is a small Gothic structure. It was rebuilt, except the tower, in 1760, and enlarged on the north side in 1830, when a new gallery was erected. The Duke of Sutherland is patron of the perpetual curacy, in the incumbency of the Rev Wm. Oliver."

From History, Gazetteer and Directory of Staffordshire,
William White, Sheffield, 1851


Memorials at St. John's Church
Memorials at St. John's Church
 

Note the memorials to the Wedgwood family, including Arthur Felix Wedgwood who was killed in World War One, and Francis Hamilton Wedgwood (1867 - 1930) who headed the Wedgwood factory at Etruria throughout the depression years of the 1920s.

The Jasper memorial plaques are to Camilla Hildegarde Wedgwood (right), the anthropologist, and Lord Wedgwood of Barlaston (left).

 

Photograph by courtesy of the Trustees of the Wedgwood Museum,
Barlaston, Stoke-on-Trent, Staffordshire.

Staffordshire Past Tracks
 



next: Barlaston Hall
previous: St. Mary's Church, Swynnerton
contents: index of buildings south of the Potteries

 

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