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Neville Malkin's "Grand Tour" of the Potteries

buildings outlying Longton
 


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No 107 -  Park Keepers Lodge, Longton Park

Trentham Road Entrance - Longton Park Gates & Lodge
Trentham Road Entrance - Longton Park Gates & Lodge
photo: William Blake c.1900-1940

Park scene taken at Longton Park, Stoke-on-Trent, Staffordshire. 
This view includes the Trentham Road entrance, gates and lodge.

The park's official name is Queen's Park and it was officially opened on July 25th 1888 by George Granville William Sutherland Levison-Gower, the third Duke of Sutherland

The Potteries Museum & Art Gallery - Staffordshire Past Track

Staffordshire Past Track

 

 


The Park Keepers Lodge, Longton Park
pen drawing by Neville Malkin - August 1975


The Park Keepers Lodge and entrance gates at Longton Park
The Park Keepers Lodge and entrance gates at Longton Park
photo: Google Street View

 

 

"This park keeper's half-timbered lodge stands at the entrance to the beautifully-kept Queen's Park, Longton, reputed to be the oldest park in the City.

It was created to commemorate Queen Victoria's Golden Jubilee. In March, 1887, on a 45-acre site donated by the Duke of Sutherland, the Mayor of Longton, Alderman John Aynesley, cut the first turf; this was followed by the planting of a Norwegian maple and pine by the Mayoress. 

The park was officially opened a year later by the third Duke, George Granville William Sutherland Leveson-Gower, K.G., who gave the deed of conveyance of Queen's Park to the people of Longton.

For this opening ceremony a large and expensive gold key had been specially made by Elkington's, of Birmingham; it carried the arms of the Sutherlands and of Longton Borough, and the inscription "Queen's Park, Longton, opened 25th July 1888." With this key, the Duke opened three ornamental gates at the main entrance; each gate carried the arms of the Duke, the Borough and the Mayor.

The North Staffordshire Railway gave 300 tons of stone for lining the two-acre upper lake which was stocked with 1,000 trout, while the three-acre lower lake, originally four feet deep, was filled with roach, perch and carp. Further additions, such as the bowling green and pavilion, were made in 1906.

There is an interesting tale concerning the four swans, which, at the behest of the Duke, had been transferred from Trentham Park lake to Longton Park. One of the swans, who probably missed the tranquil surroundings of Trentham lake, decided to return to its old haunts; unfortunately, its attempted escape was intercepted by workmen at the Blurton Toll House, who immediately took it back to Longton Park. The other swans must have considered this escape attempt a violation of the 'swan code', because, shortly afterwards, they killed it.

13th August 1975

 

 

 

 

 



next: The Longton Cottage Hospital
previous: The Old Longton High School 
contents: index of buildings outlying Longton


 

 

 

 

 

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Staffordshire Past Track