Shaw and Copestake Ltd






 

Location and period of operation:

Shaw and Copestake Ltd

Longton

1894

May 1982

 (See sources)

The Sylvan Works were founded in 1894 by William Shaw and his uncle William Copestake. 
Initially at the Drury Works, Normacot Road, Longton but very soon afterwards at the Sylvan Works, Normacot Road. 
William Copestake left the partnership halfway through the first year and in 1895 Mr. Richard Hull became William Shaw's partner in the business. 

The Sylvan Works, under the trade name 'Sylvac', produced an extensive range of animal models and other novelties, posy bowls, flower vases. 

In 1936 became a Ltd company. In 1938 the directors of Shaw & Copestake acquired the company: Thomas Lawrance (Longton) Limited of the Falcon Pottery, Waterloo Street, Longton.  

Until a suitable factory was built on land opposite the old Shaw and Copestake the two companies operated independently for nineteen years. In 1957 new works were opened at Barford Street, Longton. At this time 140 people were employed.  

New premises, gradually merged the two businesses and the Falcon Mark of Thomas Lawrance was ceased in 1964. 

Following the voluntary liquidation of Shaw and Copestake in 1982 the factory and contents were bought by the North Midlands Co-Operative Society and from there they leased it to a workers co-operative society called Longton Ceramics. A year and a half later the United Co-Operative society took over and ran it as the Crown Windsor name. This was not a successful venture and only managed five months of production before liquidation. The premises was bought by Portmeirion Potteries Ltd in 1991 (1989??) who began to operate there.

early Shaw & Copestake 'daisy' trademark
early Shaw & Copestake 'daisy' trademark
c.1925-1936

Data sheet on Shaw & Copestake

SylvaC collectors club web site

 


 

Initials used on ware for identification:

SILVO
[some 1920's ware was identified with this impressed mark]

SylvaC
[SylvaC is always spelt with a large S and C]

SylvaCeramics

 

 


click for more information....

     

 

 
see a 1954 article on Thomas Lawrance and Shaw & Copestake


email: Steve Birks

30.10.2003