Stoke-on-Trent - Potworks of the week


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Alcock, Lindley and Bloore at the Scotia Works, Burslem


  • Originally the parish workhouse of Burslem - after a new workhouse had been built the buildings were then used as a barracks. 

  • In 1857, purchased by James Vernon and converted into a pottery manufactory.

  • In 1862, the works were taken by the firm of Bodley & Harrold and shortly afterwards Edward F. Bodley & Co. this company closed 1898.

  • From 1894 to 1933 the Scotia Works were operated by the brothers C.F. and A. Bailey as The Burslem Pottery Co. Ltd

  • c.1925 Messrs. Alcock, Lindley and Bloore (who also had pottery works in Hanley) purchased the Scotia Works in Burslem. The Burslem Pottery Co. Ltd continued to operate at the Scotia Works until c.1933.

  • The factory was demolished in 1956. 

 

 

 


The Burslem Pottery Co. Ltd at the Scotia Works

from..... 1907 Staffordshire Sentinel 
'Business Reference Guide to The Potteries, Newcastle & District'


 

 

 

Alcock, Lindley and Bloore, Burslem

Alcock, Lindley and Bloore, Burslem - on the corner of Overhouse Street, Wedgwood Place and Scotia Road
photo: E. J. D. Warrillow collection

 

 

Most of the bottle kilns are countained in the buildings, only the top of the hovel shows above the roof. The smoke shows that only one of the kilns is firing - the firing was 20% of the cycle. 

A typical bottle oven followed a 14 day cycle: six days to fill, three days to fire, three days to soak and cool, a day to empty, and a day to repair the internal-brickwork

 

 

 


the Scotia Pottery - the part of the works to the left was originally the Burslem parish workhouse in Overhouse Street
the Scotia Pottery - the part of the works to the left was originally the Burslem parish workhouse in Overhouse Street

 

 

 

 

the same view in 2011 - to the left Greenhead Street to the right Scotia Road
the same view in 2011 - to the left Overhouse Street to the right Scotia Road 
Google Steet View

the houses on the far right, on the corner of Bycars Road, can be seen on both photos

 

 


 

Alcock, Lindley & Bloore, Ltd.

 

map from 1947 Pottery Gazette & Glass Trade Review

11 Wood & Sons, Ltd.

12 Ford & Sons (Crownford), Ltd. 

13 Wade, Heath & Co., Ltd. / Staffs. Teapot Co.

14 George Wade & Son, Ltd.

15 W. R. Midwinter, Ltd.

16 John Maddock & Sons, Ltd.

17 James Sadler & Sons, Ltd. 

18 Barratt's of Staffordshire, Ltd. / King & Barratt, Ltd.

19 Alcock, Lindley & Bloore, Ltd.
(Head Office: Ascot Pottery, Hanley)

 

 

 

Scotia Works shown in blue - c.1900
Scotia Works shown in blue - c.1900 

 

 

 

1851 map showing the old workhouse which at this time was used as a barracks
1851 map showing the old workhouse which at this time was used as a barracks 
The Overhouse Pottery and the Foaming Quart public house can be seen 
both on this map and the 1900 map

Staffordshire Past Track


 

 


A new workhouse was built at Greenhead in 1780 and was enlarged in the 1830's to hold 300. It had only 152 inmates in 1838, but this figure was a large increase on the average for the previous few years. 

After a new union workhouse in Turnhurst Road, Chell, was built c. 18389. The old parish workhouse was leased out as an infantry barracks by the early 1850's and was sold by the guardians in 1857 for 1,000. It was bought by James Vernon who converted it into the Scotia Pottery.

source - A History of the County of Stafford, vol 8

 



Scotia Works

"This manufactory was originally the parish workhouse of Burslem. It was then, in 1857, converted into a manufactory by James Vernon who, in 1862, was succeeded by the firm of Bodley & Harrold and shortly afterwards Edward F. Bodley & Co., who in 1880 changed to Edward F. Bodley & Sons and in 1881 removed to the New Bridge Pottery, Longport. At these works, the usual descriptions of earthenware, printed, enamelled and gilt, and "ironstone china', for steamship and hotel use, were made. The bodies and glazes were considerably improved by the manager, Edward Beardmore.
The mark was the Staffordshire knot, with the words SCOTIA WORKS. This firm ceased in 1898."

Jewitt's Ceramic Art of Great Britian

 


 

the Stafford Knot mark of Bodley & Co

the Stafford Knot mark of Bodley & Co
'Prince of Wales' is the pattern name
the registration diamond shows that 
this pattern was registered in 1866 

 


 

 

the mark of Alcock, Lindley & Bloore

the mark of Alcock, Lindley & Bloore 

 

Alcock, Lindley & Bloore were well known for producing teapots

Alcock, Lindley & Bloore were well known for producing teapots

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 


contents: 2011 photos

 

related pages 


Bodley potters - The Bodley family operated 3 pottery works, one of them was the Scotia Works. 

The Burslem Pottery Co. Ltd at the Scotia Works

Alcock, Lindley & Bloore - Vulcan Pottery Works, Hanley

Swinnerton's Ltd


external links..
Staffordshire Past Track 


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