Stoke-on-Trent - Potworks of the week


contents: 2011 photos


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Broad Street Works, Hanley

The Broad Street Works had a long long history - opened in the early 1700's, rebuilt in 1815
eventually becoming George Ashworth & Brothers manufacturing the famous Mason's Ironstone China
and continuing until 1998 - over 250 years of production at the one site. 


  • The works of John Astbury (d. 1743) is said to have passed to John Baddeley (d. 1772) and are identified with the pottery on the west side of High Street (now Broad Street), Shelton. 

  • From 1750 to 1772 the works were operated by Ralph & John Baddeley - 

"Mr R Baddeley first made the Blue printed ware; and which subjected him and his brother to the highest censure for extravagance, in having a manufactory covered with tiles, instead of thatch; and for being the first who erected four hovels behind, instead of only two..."

  • After John died in 1772 the works were continued by Ralph and then from 1784 to 1806 by John & Edward Baddeley.

  • From 1806 to 1822 the works were operated by Hicks & Meigh.

Job Meigh II initially worked for his father in the Old Hall Pottery but by 1807 he had left to go into partnership with Richard Hicks, his brother-in-Law
In 1815 they rebuilt the Broad Street works in a typical rectangular courtyard plan with the kilns in a line along the rear.

  • In about 1820 Thomas Johnson, their travelling representative, became a partner in the firm which was then known as Hicks, Meigh and Johnson. 
    In 1833 there were 600 employees.
    In 1835 the partnership was dissolved and the factory and its contents were put up for auction. 

  • 1836-42 the works was taken over by the partnership of Ridgway, Morley and Wear.

In 1840/1 - there were 348 employees: 
that is 125 males 69 females, adults; 
42 males, 71 female, under 21; 
23 boys, 18 girls; under 13.

  • 1842-44 the business continued as Ridgway & Morley.

  • 1845-58 Francis Morley contined the business alone. 

Francis Morley bought many of Charles Masonís moulds when the latter went bankrupt in 1848, and established the Broad Street factory as the producer of Masonís famous Ironstone China. The works also continued producing earthenware. 

  • 1859-62 Taylor Ashworth (youngest son of George Ashworth a cotton & wool mill owner from Rochdale) joined Francis Morley and the business continued as Morley & Ashworth. 

  • In 1862 Francis Morley retired from business and George Ashworth purshased the Broad Street pottery business for his four sons and continued the business as Geo. L. Ashworth & Bros.   

  • In 1883 the collapse of the woolen trade in Lancashire resulted in the Ashworth brothers selling the Broad Street business and it was purchased by John Hackett Goddard for his son John Shaw Goddard.

  • By 1883 the partners were Mr. John S. Goddard and Mr. F. L. Johnson. 

  • The business continued as a partnership of John Shaw Goddard & Charles Brock under the Geo. L. Ashworth name. In November 1885 Brock left the partnership and it was continued by J. S. Goddard on his own. 

  • James & Taylor Ashworth must have retained some interest in the business as they were both declared bankrupt in January 1902.  

  • Descendants of the Goddards continued the business and in 1968 the John Stringer Goddard renamed the business 'Mason's Ironstone China' 

  • In 1973 the business was aquired by the Waterford-Wedgwood group, John Stringer Goddard retired in 1981.

  • In 1998 production of Mason's Ironstone was transfered to Wedgwood's Barlaston factory and production at the Broad Street works ceased. The site was cleared in 1999.   

  • In 2010 a Tesco Supermarket was built on the site of the works.


 

 

 

 

the frontage of the Broad Street pottery when it was Mason's Ironstone Works

the frontage of the Broad Street pottery when it was Mason's Ironstone Works 
the factory was rarely seen by the public because it was set back from the street, 
behind shops and the Mitchell Memorial Theatre - it was not possible to get a 'straight-on' view

photo: Potworks - The Industrial Architecture of the Staffordshire Potteries
© Royal Commission on the Historical Monuments of England 1991

 

 

the pediment of the Broad Street pottery with the tripartite Venetian window 
so typical of the Potteries factories 
in 1815 the works were rebuilt by Richard Hicks & Job Meigh 

photo: Potworks - The Industrial Architecture of the Staffordshire Potteries
© Royal Commission on the Historical Monuments of England 1991

 

 


 

 

Hanley potters - to the left is Clough Street, to the right is Broad Street

Hanley potters - to the left is Clough Street, to the right is Broad Street
photo: July 1933
reproduced under licence - copyright © English Heritage/NMR Aerofilms Collection

Purple: Bell Works
Blue: Phoenix Works of Clementson
Orange: Broad Street Works
Green:
The White House

 

 

the Broad Street Works at the bottom left of this 1933 photo

the Broad Street Works at the bottom left of this 1933 photo 

 

 

Light Blue: the flint mill of Clementsons Potters & Millers Ltd
Blue: the location of the Phoenix pottery works (mostly demolished at the time of this photo)
Orange:
the Broad Street Works - the tall chimney bears the name Ashworths 
Green: The White House

 

 

 

Broad Street, Hanley in 2010

Purple: was the Bell Works - now the Potteries Museum & Art Gallery
Blue: was the Phoenix Works, then Cinema, Bowling Alley & Casino - now a public open space
Orange: was Broad Street Works - now Tesco Supermarket
Green: was the White House - now Mitchell Memorial Youth Arts Centre

Bing Maps


1877 map showing The Broad Street pottery works - the green circle is the White House†
1877 map showing The Broad Street pottery works - the green circle is the White House 


 

The White House fronting the Broad Street pottery works
The White House fronting the Broad Street pottery works
behind the White house can be seen the chimney of the Ashworth's pottery works
The house and other buildings meant that the works were hidden from view

photo: E.J.D. Warrillow

The White House fronting the Broad Street potworks was the home of Richard Hicks (of the partnership Hicks & Meigh). Later it was occupied by the dentist Crapper & Co. 

The White House was demolished after the Second World War and is now the site of the Mitchell Memorial Theatre in Broad Street. 

 

view of the frontage of the  Mason's Ironstone Works Broad Street pottery
a rare view of the frontage of the  Mason's Ironstone Works Broad Street pottery 
this was the laying of the foundation stones of the Mitchell Memorial Theatre in 1955
the White House had been demolished and so the pottery works were visable from Broad Street

photo: supplied by Fred Hughes 


 

This 1950's photo of Broad Street and Shelton shows the Broad Street Pottery Works
This 1950's photo of Broad Street and Shelton shows the Broad Street Pottery Works  

 

 

In the background is the spoilt tips of the Hanley Deep Pit Colliery
the blue line shows a train on the railway line from the colliery to the Shelton Iron & Steel Works
Red: The Broad Street Works
Green: The Grand Hotel on Trinity Street
Yellow: Methodist Church on corner of Marsh Street and Brunswick Street
- later the Scout Shop, then Blacks Camping Shop, then Portofino's Restaurant
Light Blue: the Red Lion Public House on Broad Street

 

 


 

 

Geo. L. Ashworth & Bros., Ltd.

14 G. M. Creyke & Sons, Ltd.

15 Wulstan Pottery, Ltd.

16 Geo. L. Ashworth & Bros., Ltd.

 

map from 1947 Pottery Gazette & Glass Trade Review

 

 

 


 

4th August 1860 - dissolution of the partnership between Morley & Ashworth

4th August 1860 - dissolution of the partnership between Morley & Ashworth

4th August 1860 - dissolution of the 
partnership between Morley & Ashworth

 


 

25th April 1866 - the changing fortunes of the Woollen, Cotton & Earthenware businesses of Ashworth

25th April 1866 - the changing fortunes of the 
Woollen, Cotton & Earthenware businesses of Ashworth 

 


 

19th December 1883 - bankruptcy of Ashworth's Sunnybank Mills, Rochdale and the Earthenware business at Broad Street, Hanley

19th December 1883 - bankruptcy of Ashworth's Sunnybank Mills, Rochdale 
and the Earthenware business at Broad Street, Hanley

 


 

30th November 1885 - Charles Brock leaves the partnership which continues by John Shaw Goddard alone

30th November 1885 - Charles Brock leaves the partnership 
which continues by John Shaw Goddard alone  

 


 

James & Taylor Ashworth must have retained some interest in the business as they were both declared bankrupt in January 1902.

James & Taylor Ashworth must have retained some interest in 
the business as they were both declared bankrupt in January 1902.  

 


 

 

Messrs. George L. Ashworth and Bros.,
Ironstone, China, and Earthenware Manufacturers,
Broad Street, Hanley.

The ironstone, china and earthenware trades possess no better known names as manufacturers, than Messrs. George L. Ashworth and Brothers, of the Broad Street Works, Hanley, and it can be honestly stated that the productions of the firm are known in the leading markets throughout the civilised world. The foundation of the firm dates as far back as 1720, and as the firm grew older no single opportunity was lost in improving both productions and style. The firm at the present time give employment to a large number of workers. The present proprietors are Mr. John S. Goddard and Mr. F, L. Johnson, who still retain the old title, together with the old energy and enterprise. The London offices are at Hatton Garden, The factory, if permission be obtained to inspect it, provides a sight of a most interesting nature, the different intricate processes being gone through with a skill and certainly that is little short of marvellous. The firm are principally known for their exquisite productions from the designs of the late Mr. Charles Mason, whose name will long be remembered. The firm purchased these designs and patterns from Mr. Mason, so that they are their exclusive property, and are used in the manufactore of dinner, tea and other services, Japan ware, domestic utensils, and a vast array of articles in ironstone and earthenware. For beauty and originality there is still nothing to beat them, and they are in greater demand than ever. A notable speciality owned by the firm is Goddard's "Simplex" patent cover. There has been a long felt want for a really good jug cover, which shall at the same time be simple, cheap to make, and automatic in its action. This cover the patentee claims to have all these qualifications, and to have advantages over any other cover for jugs made in pottery, which has hitherto been brought out. The feature of this cover is, that instead ol slots, holes are pierced through the sides of the top of the jug, and a spring made of special wire is bent into a half circle, and passes through two eyes in either side of the top of the cover, and so through the bole in the jug, and the cover opens and shuts by tilting forward or holding upright the jug. Two nibs or loops are bent in the wire opposite the eyes and holes in either side, and by the compression of the wire, by means of these, the wire can be withdrawn from the holes in the side of the jug, and the cover thus liberated, so that this cover has the following advantages : A jug can be used either with or without the cover. The act of pouring out the contents from a jug opens the cover. The cover cannot fall off, even if the jug is turned upside down. There is no liability of breakage at the points where the cover is attached. It therefore approaches as near as possible perfection, and is very largely in demand. The firm ranks high in the industrial world, and is worthy of the reputation it has so justly gained, and so long maintained.



 

from....

A descriptive account of The Potteries (illustrated)
1893 advertising and trade journal.

 


 

1955 advert for Mason's Patent Ironstone China

1955 advert for Mason's Patent Ironstone China 
Sole reproducers of Mason's Patterns and Shapes
Geo. L. Ashworth & Bros. Ltd.
Hanley, Stoke-on-Trent


 

 

Real Ironstone China

Real Ironstone China 

 

G. L. Ashworth & Bros. Hanley

G. L. Ashworth & Bros. Hanley 

 

Ashworth

Ashworth 

 

A. Bros. Real Ironstone China

A. Bros. Real Ironstone China 

 

Mason's a member of the Wedgwood Group

Mason's a member of the Wedgwood Group


 

 

Tesco Supermarket on the site of the Broad Street Pottery Works

Tesco Supermarket on the site of the Broad Street Pottery Works
on the left is the newly refurbished Mitchell Memorial Youth Arts Centre
on the right the ground where the Phoenix Pottery Works stood

photo: June 2011   


 


contents: 2011 photos

 

 

related pages 


Broad Street Works - dates and description of working conditions

1956 article on Geo. L. Ashworth & Bros Ltd. 


external links..

Mason Collection and History at Keele University


also see..

Advert of the Week

Photo of the Week