Stoke-on-Trent - Potworks of the week



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Daisy Bank Works, Longton
in 1952 the works were renamed Gainsborough Works. 

  • The Daisy Bank Works was built in 1853 on Spring Garden Road, nearby was the Daisy Bank Brick and Tile Works which had an infamous marl hole that they dug the clay from.

  • In 1877 Longton Municipal Cemetery was opened alongside the Daisy Bank Pottery Works.

  • Operators at the works were:

    • 1853 - 1866  Hulse, Nixon & Adderley

    • 1869 - 1875  Hulse & Adderley

    • 1876 - 1906  W.A. Adderley & Co

    • 1906 - 1947  Adderley's Ltd

    • 1947    in 1947 the business was taken over by Ridgway Potteries Ltd but ware continued to be produced under the Adderley name. At some time ware was produced under the name 'Adderley Floral China' in Sutherland Road, Longton.

    • 1952  the business of Ridgways (Bedford Works) Ltd and Adderleys Ltd were renamed Ridgway & Adderley Ltd.

    • 1955  on January 1st merged with Booths & Colclough's Ltd. as Ridgway, Adderley, Booths & Colclough Ltd. which was remaned  Ridgway Potteries Ltd from 28th February 1955. 

  • It appears that c.1955 work ceased at the Gainsborough Works (renamed from the Daisy Bank Works) and was transfered to the Paladin Works which was also in Longton and operated by Adderley. 

  • In 2005 the land was used to open a private cemetery and garden of remembrance - next door to Longton Cemetery which is still run by the city council. 

 

 

 


1907 map showing the Daisy Bank Works on Spring Garden Road
1907 map showing the Daisy Bank Works on Spring Garden Road
opposite is the marl hole of the Daisy Bank Brick & Tile Works
and to the far left is the marl hole of the Longton Hall Brick Works

 

Adderley's Ltd, china and earthenware
manufacturers at Spring Garden Road, Longton
 

from..... 1907 Staffordshire Sentinel 
'Business Reference Guide to The Potteries, Newcastle & District'

 


 

1922 map showing the Daisy Bank Works on Spring Garden Road
1922 map showing the Daisy Bank Works on Spring Garden Road



the same area in 2012 the site of the former Daisy Bank Works is marked in blue
the same area in 2012 the site of the former Daisy Bank Works is marked in blue
and the site of the Daisy Bank Brick & Tile Works is marked in purple

Google Maps


Trentham Road and Longton Cemetery, Longton, 1927
Trentham Road and Longton Cemetery, Longton, 1927

Longton Cemetery and Daisy Bank marl hole are easily identified
to the left of centre.

 

a closer view of Daisy Bank marl hole and the surrounding pottery factories
a closer view of Daisy Bank marl hole and the surrounding pottery factories
the Daisy Bank pottery works of Adderley's is at the bottom right of the cemetery

to the immediate left of the marl hole, opposite the cemetery is the Roman Catholic 
School of St. Gregory's - it is still in use today (2013) 

 


some of the more obvious streets and factories are highlighted on this photo 

yellow rectangle St. Gregory's R.C. School
white line Spring Garden Road
yellow line Willow Row
dark purple line Edensor Road
red line Greendock Street
green line Clayton Street
light blue line Ayshford Street
dark blue line The Strand (was Stafford Street)
light purple line Willow Street
dark blue rectangle Daisy Bank Works of Adderleys Ltd.
red rectangle  Holdcroft's pottery works
light blue oval  Hewitt & Leadbeater, porcelain 
dark blue oval Tams' Crown Works

 



 

 

 

 


 


 

 

 

related pages 


The Daisy Bank marl pit was bordered by Spring Garden Road to the south and Edensor Road to the west. 
Nearby were the rather optimistically named Paradise and Orchard Streets surrounded by a myriad of smoking bottle kilns.  

 

Longton - In 1759 the main road from Derby to Newcastle was built which gave the town of Longton a boost when the pottery industry began to appear in the town. Small numerous pot works gave the new town a distinctive irregular appearance with pot banks lining the main streets jumbled in and around houses of the workers employed in the ceramic industry.