Machin & Potts






 

Location and period of operation:

Machin & Potts

Burslem

c.1834

Oct 1838

 

China and earthenware manufacturer at Waterloo Road, Burslem, Stoke-on-Trent, England

  • William Wainwright Potts was previously in partnership with his brother, John Potts, and Richard Oliver as Potts, Oliver and Potts at the St. George's Works in New Mills, Derbyshire. John Potts had invented a method of printing on calico fabric, using copper rollers onto which patterns had been engraved. Potts, Oliver and Potts produced the engraved rolls for the printers. This partnership was dissolved in the 26th September 1831, John Potts continued on his own account. 

  • In 1831 the two Potts brothers took out a patent on a modified machine to print continuous patterns on long lenghths of transfer tissue for pottery, firstly a single colour and in 1835 they patented a machine which could print multiple colours. 
    Sources: Printed British Pottery & Porcelain

  • Around 1833 William W Potts joined William Machin who was already operating at the Watterloo Pottery in Burslem, Stoke-on-Trent. 

  • They also carried on a business as Japanners with William Bourne as Potts, Machin & Bourne.

  • Both of the partnerships were dissolved by mutual consent on the 18th October 1838.  

  • A 1846 trade directory lists William Wainwright Potts at Waterloo Road, Burslem as "patentee of the royal cylindrical printing" - it is uncertain if he was still producing pottery. 

 


 

London Gazette 
30 September 1831

 
notice of the dissolution of the partnership between
Potts, Oliver & Potts - engravers to Calico-Printers

 


 

London Gazette 
26 October 1838
 


notice of the dissolution of the partnership between
Machin & Potts - china and earthenware manufacturers 


notice of the dissolution of the partnership between
Potts, Machin & Bourne  - Japanners

 




relief moulded Tam O'Shanter Burn's Jug

The jug is based on the narrative poem Tam O'Shanter by the Scottish poet Robert Burns (his bust appears in white on the front of the jug)

The poem is about a drunken farmer (based on one of Burns' friends) who is chased by witches as he rides his mare home after a day at the public house and is captured in every aspect of the jug - the drunken pub scene on one side, the horse ride through the forest on the other side, and the hand grabbing the handle which is made in the shape of a mare's tail (in the poem, Tam reaches the safety of Brig O'Doon - the bridge over the river Doon - just as a pursuing witch pulls off the tail on his horse Meg)

  


Published
as the Act directs
June 20th 1834
Machin & Potts
Burslem Staffordshire

 

 

 

 


 


Yellow floral border with black engraved scene of Tronsberg, Germany

Machin & Potts's Patent
Printed
Staffordshire Potteries

Continental Views
M & P
Tronsberg

the circular mark incorporates the Royal Arms and the Stafford Knot

 

 

 


plate in the Continental Views series - Mount Olympus


Continental Views - "A series of individually titled views of Europe made by Machin & Potts of Burslem. The series and individual titles appear along with the makerís initials M&P in a printed cartouche mark, and one of two different marks referring to the firmís patent process also sometimes appears." 

courtesy: Dick Henrywood's highlights


Machin & Potts's
Patent

Continental Views
M & P
Mount Olympus

 

 


 


transfer-ware platter in the Cavendish pattern 

PATENT
M & P 

 

photos courtesy: Brandon

 


 

 

Marks used on ware for identification:

M & P

Machin & Potts

Machin & Potts's Patent

 

 


Machin & Potts's Patent
Printed
Staffordshire Potteries

the circular mark incorporates the Royal Arms and the Stafford Knot


Machin & Potts's
Patent

in the centre of the mark is the one of the mottos of the Royal Arms and the symbols of the four nations of England, Wales, Scotland and Ireland


Patent
M & P

this mark, with the herald, seems only to be used with the Cavendish pattern


Continental Views
M & P

there were a number of scenes in the Continental Views series

 


Questions, comments, contributions? email: Steve Birks